Engine Compartment Cleaning Merrimack NH

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Best Honda Cycle Center
(603) 889-0161
579 Amherst Street
Nashua, NH
Services
Motorcycle Fabrication,Motorcycle Repair,Truck Dealers,Used Car Dealers,Auto Dealers

Dobles Chevrolet Inc
(603) 669-8480
1250 S Willow Street
Manchester, NH
Services
Clutch Repair,Auto Dealers

Big Als Custom Car Care
(603) 483-2031
200 Raymond Rd
Candia, NH
Services
Brake Repair,Engine Repair,Fuel Injection Repair,Service Stations,Tune up Repair,Auto Dealers

Clark Chrysler Jeep
(978) 683-8775
175 Pelham Street
Methuen, MA
Services
Alignment Repair,Auto Body Repair,Fuel Injection Repair,Radiator Repair,Tune up Repair,Used Car Dealers,Auto Dealers

Emerald Isle Auto Sales
(603) 429-1500
475 Daniel Webster Hwy
Merrimack, NH

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Autofair Toyota Of Manchester
(603) 624-1800
33 Auto Center Rd
Manchester, NH
Services
Clutch Repair,Fuel Injection Repair,Radiator Repair,Tune up Repair,Auto Dealers

Townsend Sales and Service Inc
(978) 597-8955
340 Main Street PO Box 531
Townsend, MA
Services
Clutch Repair,Radiator Repair,SUV Repair,Tune up Repair,Truck Dealers,Used Car Dealers,Auto Dealers

Chevrolet Of Lowell
(978) 458-2526
831 Rogers St
Lowell, MA
Services
Auto Body Repair,Truck Auto Body,Truck Service Station,Truck Dealers,Used Car Dealers,Auto Dealers

Neat Auto Sales
(603) 429-4323
396 Daniel Webster Hwy
Merrimack, NH

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Merrimack Autosport Sales
(603) 429-4007
1 Columbia Cir
Merrimack, NH

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A Clean Engine Compartment Can Pay Dividends

By Bill Siuru   

Vehicles owners often spend hours cleaning and waxing the exteriors of their vehicles and time keeping the interiors spice and span. However, they never pop the hood except maybe to check fluid levels. After a few years, the engine compartment becomes a real mess. Fortunately, today's fuel-injected, electronically controlled engines are whole lot cleaner than the days of the carburetor. Still it is important to keep a clean engine compartment.

For starters, cleaner engines run cooler since dirt a thick film of crud can interfere with heat transfer from the engine. This is especially important with modern engines that operate hotter in more compactly configured engine compartments. It is easier to see oil, ATF and coolant leaks and well as when belts are about to go south in a tidy engine compartment. When repairs have to be made, it is much more pleasant to do the work in a clean environment. If you drive in a dusty areas, dirt and dust particles can lead to premature wear of components and belts. If you live in the salt belt, a saline solution that occurs whenever the engine compartment is damp can lead to rusting. The biggest reason to keep engine components free of oil and fuel soaked gunk is to prevent underhood fires.

Unless an engine compartment is hopelessly dirty and you might need a professional cleaning, the job can be done in your driveway with a garden hose and cleaning products specially designed for the task. Make sure any cleaning products used are environmentally friendly. Better yet, do the job at a self-serve car wash designed to handle the greasy run off.

Cleaning should be done with a warm, but definitely not a hot, engine. The engine should be warm enough to soften grease and other dirt to make it easier to remove. Before starting. Check the battery and cables. Clean any corrosion using the traditional baking soda solution. This will insure that highly corrosive battery acid is not sprayed around the engine compartment or onto the body. When using the baking soda, make sure none gets into the battery itself where it can degrade the electrolyte.

Next cover anything that could damaged by large amounts of water. This includes air intakes, air filters, oil dipstick, breather caps, distributors, coils and electronic black boxes. Use different size plastic bags for covering items. Seal the bags using rubber bags. Masking tape will often loosen when hit with water and plastic tape can be hard to remove after getting wet. Aluminum foil also works well because it can be shaped around the part. However, make sure it will not fly off when hit with high pressure water.

Spray the warm engine and compartment with the degreaser according to directions on the container. Start at the bottom and work upwards. Since degreasers will remove wax, cover the body to prevent removal by the overspray. Better yet save the waxing job until after doing the engine compartment. Let the degreaser sit for...

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