Car Oil Change Farmington NM

This page provides relevant content and local businesses that can help with your search for information on Car Oil Change. You will find informative articles about Car Oil Change, including "Recycling Motor Oil". Below you will also find local businesses that may provide the products or services you are looking for. Please scroll down to find the local resources in Farmington, NM that can help answer your questions about Car Oil Change.

Jiffy Lube
(505) 326-1500
4350 E Main St
Farmington, NM
Services
Oil Change and Lube, Automotive Transmission

Jiffy Lube
(505) 327-3885
551 E MAIN ST
FARMINGTON, NM
Hours
Sun: CLOSED
Mon-Sat: 8:00 AM-6:00 PM

Finch Lube and Car Care
(505) 564-8940
2411 San Juan Boulevard
Farmington, NM
Services
Oil Change and Lube,Auto Glass Repair

Jiffy Lube
(505) 327-3858
1721 E 20TH ST
FARMINGTON, NM
Hours
Sun: CLOSED
Mon-Sat: 8:00 AM-6:00 PM

Lubricators Quick Lube and Car
(505) 326-4050
1600 E 20th Street
Farmington, NM
Services
Oil Change and Lube,Fuel Injection Repair,Gas Stations,Convenience Stores

Farmington Tire and Service Inc
(505) 325-8855
504 Airport Drive
Farmington, NM
Services
Oil Change and Lube,Alignment Repair

Amsoil Products Distributor
(505) 326-1093
609 E Apache Street
Farmington, NM
Services
Oil Change and Lube

Jiffy Lube
(505) 327-3858
1721 E 20th St
Farmington, NM
Services
Oil Change and Lube, Automotive Transmission

Diesel Tune Inc
(505) 325-7100
1350 W Murray Drive
Farmington, NM
Services
Oil Change and Lube,Tune up Repair

Jiffy Lube
(505) 326-1500
4350 E MAIN ST
FARMINGTON, NM
Hours
Sun: CLOSED
Mon-Thu: 8:00 AM-6:00 PM
Fri: 8:00 AM-7:00 PM
Sat: 8:00 AM-6:00 PM

Recycling Motor Oil

By William D. Siuru, PhD, PE   

Even the with Jiffy Lube, Grease Monkey and other companies offering quick oil changes, the American Petroleum Institute says, over 50-percent of us still change our own oil. Do-it-yourselfers generate about 150 millions gallons of used motor oil each year. Many dispose of the used oil properly; unfortunately, too many don’t. Though illegal in many communities, used motor is poured into drains, thrown away in the trash so it ends up in landfills or simply poured on the ground. According to the EPA, over 40-percent of our nation’s oil pollution comes from improper disposal of used motor oil by DIYers.

Motor oil doesn’t wear out �' it just gets dirty. As it circulates through engines it picks contaminants including toxic materials. Labels on oil containers read, “CAUTION: Avoid prolonged or repeated skin contact with used motor oil.” Used motor oil has been shown to cause skin cancer in laboratory animals. Thoroughly wash exposed areas with soap and water." Improperly disposed of oil can find its way into lakes, streams and waterways, polluting bodies of and drinking water supplies, as well as damaging aquatic environments and wildlife. Just one gallon of oil, the quantity from a single oil change, can contaminate one million gallons of freshwater - a year’s supply of water for 50 people - or render a four-acre area of soil non-productive for farming or plant growth for up to 100 years!

Drain your oil into a clean container with a tight fitting cap. A one-gallon, plastic milk jug or water container works well. Do not mix the recovered oil with any other liquids such as antifreeze or automatic transmission fluid. Make sure the oil is free from dirt, leaves and other debris. Then take it to an oil collection location. Nationally there are more than 12,000 oil recycling locations provided by either local governments or private businesses. Many service stations, repair facilities and quick lubes will accept used oil without charge. Other might charge a small disposal fee. A good source for information on local collection centers is Earth 911 (www.earth911.org or 1-877-EARTH911)

And what happens to the used oil? Over half of the used oil, over 380 million gallons, is recycled annually in the U.S. Used motor oil can be re-used in one of three ways �' re-refined, reconditioned, or reprocessed. This reduces the need to refine new oil from imported crude oil as well as the environmental problem.

Currently, 14-percent of used motor oil is re-refined. Re-refining removes impurities so that it can be used as a motor oil base stock again. However, re-refining is a sophisticated process consuming considerable quantities of energy, which in the U.S. often means burning petroleum fuel in power generating plants. Thus, motor oil made from re-refined basestock typically costs more than new oil made from virgin crude oil. It is a hard sell to convince consumers to buy a product is perceived to be “used” that is ...

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